Staff:
Matt Brinkman, Predator Biologist; Project Manager

Matt holding an island foxCA Least Terns courting

Jess with Hoary BatP.O. Box 1104
Arcata, CA 95518
(320) 250-5584
brinkman@iws.org

Education:

- B.S. Wildlife Management; University of Minnesota, Crookston

- Pursuing M.S. degree at Humboldt State University

 

Matt holding Red-tailed HawkResearch/Career Interests:

Soon after I graduated from the University of Minnesota, Crookston, I began working for the Institute for Wildlife Studies (IWS) on San Clemente Island as part of the Predator Research and Management crew. After working on the island for two years,
I decided that I wanted to pursue an M.S. degree in order to expand my knowledge and experience in the management and research techniques of the wildlife field.
I was offered the opportunity to manage a project through IWS, and fortunately I have also been able to incorporate my graduate research into this project.

Western Snowy Plover chickThe project that I am managing is a predator control and research program on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton in southern California.  Federally endangered California Least Terns (Sternula antillarum brownii) and federally threatened Western Snowy Plovers (Charadrius nivosus nivosus) breed and nest on the beaches of Camp Pendleton. Numerous avian (e.g. crows, ravens, hawks, owls) and mammalian (e.g. skunks, weasels, coyotes, opossums) predators have been known to prey upon these terns and plovers (there are data showing eggs, chicks, and adults as being depredated).  An effective predator control program is necessary, and my graduate research is going to focus on discovering non-lethal control methods for some, if not all of these predator species.

Holding a Common RavenPrior to my work with IWS, I worked on a Golden-winged Warbler research project on the Tamarac National Wildlife Refuge near Detroit Lakes, MN and I also worked as a summer intern for the Nongame Wildlife Department at the Brainerd MN DNR office doing sensitive shoreline research (bird point counts, marsh bird surveys, frog and toad calling surveys, as well as fish surveys).

 

Presentations:

Evaluating taste aversion as a management tool to reduce nest predation of beach-nesting birds.  M. P. Brinkman.  Presented at the Annual Meeting of the Western Section of The Wildlife Society, 28-31 January 2014, Reno, Nevada.

Conditioned taste aversion, methods and preliminary results.  M. P. Brinkman.  Presented at the Range-wide Western Snowy Plover Meeting, 14-16 January 2014, San Diego, California.

Raptor relocation at Camp Pendleton.  M. P. Brinkman.  Presented at the Range-wide Western Snowy Plover Meeting, 14-16 January 2014, San Diego, California.

Taste Aversion, Trapping, and Translocation: an overview of predator management for two protected beach-nesting birds in southern California.  M. P. Brinkman.  Presented at the Annual Meeting of the Western Section of The Wildlife Society, 26-30 January 2015, Santa Rosa, California.